HP’s 2010 Mid-Season All-Americans

It’s been a great first half of the 2010 season.  Now for the All-Americans of the midway point:

QB–Denard Robinson, Michigan: The most impressive offensive player of the first half.  Second in rushing, 12th in passing efficiency.  Heisman front runner.

RB–LaMichael James, Oregon: The nation’s top running back.  First in rushing yardage per game.  Main weapon on nation’s top offense. 

FB–Owen Marecic, Stanford: Throwback fullback who can run, block and catch.  Also plays defense.

WR–Justin Blackmon, Oklahoma State; Alshon Jeffery, South Carolina: Blackmon leads the nation in receiving yardage and scoring.  Jeffery has turned into a physically dominant wide out.

TE–Michael Egnew, Missouri: The latest in a recent line of stud Tiger tight ends.

OL Unit–Oregon: This fivesome has paced the Ducks to 317 rushing yards per game, while allowing just two sacks.

DE–Vinny Curry, Marshall; Ryan Kerrigan, Purdue: Curry leads the nation in sacks with 8, while Kerrigan already has 13 tackles for loss.

DT–Brandon Bair, Oregon; Drake Nevis, LSU: Bair leads the Pac-10 with 12.5 tackles for loss, while Nevis has 5 sacks and 10.5 tackles for loss.

LB–Lavonte David, Nebraska;  Akeem Ayers, UCLA; Greg Jones, Michigan State–These three backers are the heart and souls of their respective defenses.

CB–Patrick Peterson, LSU; Greg Reid, Florida State: Two lockdown corners who also serve as great return men.

S–Mark Barron, Alabama; Tony Jefferson, Oklahoma: Barron leads the Tide defense in tackles, while Jefferson might be the best freshman defender in the country.

P–Trevor Hankins, ASU–Leads the nation with an average of 48.5 yards per punt.

PK–Nate Whitaker, Stanford:  A perfect 11 for 11 on field goals (including a game winner), plus an impressive 15 touchbacks on kickoffs.

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Chris Huston, A.K.A. ‘The Heisman Pundit‘, is a Heisman voter and the creator and publisher of Heismanpundit.com, a site dedicated to analysis of the Heisman Trophy and college football. Dubbed “the foremost authority on the Heisman” by Sports Illustrated, HP is regularly quoted or cited during football season in newspapers across the country. He is also a regular contributor on sports talk radio and television.

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28 Responses to HP’s 2010 Mid-Season All-Americans

  1. Chris October 12, 2010 at 7:56 am #

    Let’s see the breakdown:

    Pac 10 – 11
    Big 10 – 3
    Big 12 – 4
    SEC – 4
    ACC – 1
    Big East -0

    Now we know what HP thinks a world free of bias would look like. Marshall has as many representatives as the ACC and Big East combined.

    • Heismanpundit October 12, 2010 at 10:58 am #

      typical distortions, zero contributions, SEC know-nothingism on display.

  2. JMB October 12, 2010 at 9:42 am #

    Rather than mindless conference counting, care to indicate any players he made mistakes on?

    Who exactly from the Big East and ACC deserves All-American honors so far?

  3. Brian October 12, 2010 at 9:58 am #

    Don’t count the OL-Oregon as 5 players either. They are one. HP has always selected the offensive line based on team because there’s little quantifiable way of determing the best offensive linemen.

  4. brendan October 12, 2010 at 10:24 am #

    Everyone bashes jim tressel for being boring, baad in big games recently, etc. However, when is he going to get the respect he deserves? Last year he didn’t have a single all-american and won the rose bowl. This year, he has the #1 team in the country and doesn’t have a single all-american on your list. The man who has won 6 big ten championships in 9 years (on pace for 7 in 10) still hasn’t won a big ten coach of the year. He develops stand-up men (look at troy smith as a freshman and then as a senior, and now pryor has gone from a cocky kid to a great teammate), doesn’t oversign like all of those “great” coaches in the SEC, and still wins with the best of them (just became the 3rd fastest big ten coach to 100 wins). If you truly think there isn’t a single all-american on the buckeyes, you’ve gotta give tressel the all-american for head coach

  5. mb October 12, 2010 at 10:31 am #

    Of Bair’s 12 TFL, 9 of them came against New Mexico, Portland St and Washington St.

  6. Chris October 12, 2010 at 11:36 am #

    I’m not sure I’d call it mindless counting since it continues to show a massive Pac 10 bias by HP.

    Let’s list a few guys NOT from the Pac 10 that deserve consideration:

    1. Quinn Sharp, Oklahoma St
    Twice as many touchbacks as any other kicker in the nation, with fewer attempts than Stanford’s Whitaker. One of the top punters in the country.

    2. LB Luke Kuechly, BC
    Plays for top 5 rushing defense and leads nation with 14.2 tackles/game.

    3. OL Michigan
    (although it’s lame that HP doesn’t know football well enough to distinguish individuals).

    4. DL Nick Fairley, Auburn
    More TFL, sacks, tackles, INTs, and QB hurries than Bair.

    5. FB Charles Clay, Tulsa
    5.9 yards/rush and 10.8 yards/rec and is on pace for 630 yards/season
    Owen Marecic of Stanford? 2.4 yards/rush and 4.1 yards/rec and is on pace for 79 total yards for the season!

  7. Heismanpundit October 12, 2010 at 12:00 pm #

    1. Sharp is, as you said, one of the top punters. But not the top punter. And he’s not the best field goal kicker, sorry.

    2. He’s just not as good as the other guys.

    3. Considered Michigan, but Oregon’s oline stats are more impressive. As for individual linemen, feel free to pick out the five that are the best and be sure to quantify it. Or you can fake it like all the other writers do.

    4. Yeah, he’s good. But I’d hate to have two SEC defensive tackles on this team and get accused of bias toward the SEC. Maybe you are right, though. I should’ve replaced Nevis with him.

    5. More to being a fullback than just rushing and catching stats. There is blocking as well and no one is better. Plus, he’s a two-way player and I wanted to recognize that in some way.

    In the end, the 18 players on the starting offense and defense has 5 Pac-10, 4 SEC, 4 Big 12, 3 Big Ten, 1 ACC and 1 non-AQ. Some bias.

  8. JMB October 12, 2010 at 12:06 pm #

    A good sign that people who rate individual offensive linemen do it lazily is that those rankings are usually almost a perfect mirror of the OL rankings for the next NFL draft. I bet most of them just take the first 5 OL names on Kiper’s big board.

  9. steve October 12, 2010 at 12:44 pm #

    Greg Reid? Did you see Ryan broyles and OU beat him down all day? Not only did he not shut anyone down, but OU picked on him the entire game. He was awful.

    • Heismanpundit October 12, 2010 at 3:12 pm #

      He’s played other games since then and done pretty well.

  10. Chris October 12, 2010 at 2:27 pm #

    Your team consists of 11 players from the Pac 10, not 5. Obviously the Pac 10 should be represented, but when it’s nearly half the team, the biggest statement you make is about your credibility. For a little perspective, the Pac 10 accounts for roughly 14% of the NFL draftees and 1st rounders.

    It is incredibly lazy to say the best offensive line blocks for the running back that you think is best. You sold out in the same way for Stanford last year.

    You suggest that a top 10 punter who is, by far, the #1 kickoff specialist doesn’t deserve recognition. Then you say a fullback who has 26 yards for the entire season is the best fullback in the country because he plays defense.

    • Heismanpundit October 12, 2010 at 2:35 pm #

      1. I always pick a line unit instead of individual players, so the unit counts as one selection. Wisconsin, Georgia and FSU were my top three coming into the season. But Oregon’s line is helping the Ducks average 317 rushing yards per game and has only allowed two sacks to date. To me, that shows good run blocking and good pass protection. So, this pick is entirely justified and quantifiable.

      2. Again, I separated the kickers into punter and place kicker. One guy leads the nation in punting and the other is perfect on FGs and has 15 touchbacks. There should be little or no argument on this front, unless you want to be a pissant.

  11. Chris October 12, 2010 at 3:33 pm #

    An offensive line consists of 5 players… saying it counts as 1 player is absolutely absurd.

    If you say there should be absolutely no argument because a punter leads the nation in average, shouldn’t the same be true of a linebacker who leads the nation in tackles? Flippity-floppity.

    And your Pac 10 field goal kicker doesn’t lead the nation at his position. The clear leader there is Danny Hrapmann:
    FG 14-14 (better than 10-10)
    Long 51 (better than 46)
    XP 0 misses (better than 3 misses)
    He also punts and had a 19 yard gain on a fake.

    Sure looks like Whitaker’s big accomplishment is being from the conference where you used to work.

  12. Roby October 12, 2010 at 6:19 pm #

    HP,

    I don’t know where you get your stats, but Hankins does NOT lead the league in yards per punt. That would be Florida’s Chas Henry with 18 punts for 897. Including a 75 yarder that was downed at the 2 yard line.

    I’m not going to pretend that I know everything about every punter in America. Nor am I going to pretend like I pay any real mind to any punt that isn’t blocked.

    I’m pretty sure you don’t know anything about Chas Henry, as you don’t watch the SEC like you watch the PAC 10. Just like I do not know anything about Trevor Hankins because I mostly watch SEC/ACC football. Let me enlighten you.

    By watching the Gators, I know that Chas Henry has been fantastic. In all honesty, he has been the Gators’ best and possibly most valuable player (what does that say about an offense?). He helps the defense reverse field position and helps give Florida’s struggling offense a shorter field. Moreover, he rarely gets his punts returned. Last year, I believe there was 1 punt returned for 6 yards. This year, it is more of the same. Take away one 41 yard return by Alabama, and he has given up 4 returns for 24 yards. Brilliant.

    Net punting stats are more important than gross, and Florida ranks second in the nation in that category (ASU 15th).

    http://ncaastatpages.com/specialteams/net_punting

    Usually when a player loads up on gross yardage, it is because he blasts it every time with no regard to touchbacks (ala Ray Guy). Henry only has 2 touchbacks.

    The kicker in this debate (pun intended) is that Florida’s placekicker Caleb Sturgis missed the last two games with a back injury. Having not kicked since high school, Henry came in and made 2/3 FGs and 3/3 XPs.

    Since in all likelihood, you chose your All-American punter by picking the first name on a yards per punt leaderboard, I submit that you revise your pick after looking at an accurate leaderboard.

    http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/years/2010-punting.html

  13. Roby October 13, 2010 at 12:02 am #

    Why didn’t my comment get approved?

  14. Roby October 13, 2010 at 12:02 am #

    HP,

    I don’t know where you get your stats, but Hankins does NOT lead the league in yards per punt. That would be Florida’s Chas Henry with 18 punts for 897. Including a 75 yarder that was downed at the 2 yard line.

    I’m not going to pretend that I know everything about every punter in America. Nor am I going to pretend like I pay any real mind to any punt that isn’t blocked.

    I’m pretty sure you don’t know anything about Chas Henry, as you don’t watch the SEC like you watch the PAC 10. Just like I do not know anything about Trevor Hankins because I mostly watch SEC/ACC football. Let me enlighten you.

    By watching the Gators, I know that Chas Henry has been fantastic. In all honesty, he has been the Gators’ best and possibly most valuable player (what does that say about an offense?). He helps the defense reverse field position and helps give Florida’s struggling offense a shorter field. Moreover, he rarely gets his punts returned. Last year, I believe there was 1 punt returned for 6 yards. This year, it is more of the same. Take away one 41 yard return by Alabama, and he has given up 4 returns for 24 yards. Brilliant.

    Net punting stats are more important than gross, and Florida ranks second in the nation in that category (ASU 15th).

    http://ncaastatpages.com/specialteams/net_punting

    Usually when a player loads up on gross yardage, it is because he blasts it every time with no regard to touchbacks (ala Ray Guy). Henry only has 2 touchbacks.

    The kicker in this debate (pun intended) is that Florida’s placekicker Caleb Sturgis missed the last two games with a back injury. Having not kicked since high school, Henry came in and made 2/3 FGs and 3/3 XPs.

    Since in all likelihood, you chose your All-American punter by picking the first name on a yards per punt leaderboard, I submit that you revise your pick after looking at an accurate leaderboard.

    http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/years/2010-punting.html

  15. Devin October 13, 2010 at 8:22 am #

    Stats don’t make a player the best at his position. I would take Paea of OSU over any other DT in college, but he gets triple teamed on a regular basis and doesn’t have the stats these other guys do. To argue about kickers is just assinine. First, who cares, they are kickers. Second, there are only one or two ways to quantify a kickers talent. Linebackers who lead the nation in tackling doesnt make someone the best line backer. Florida probably has 3 LB’s that are better than the BC kid, but because they play in a defense with so much talent, the stats and tackles are spread out. You have to include the O-line as a unit and not indiduals. If you didn’t and say Miami had the best O-line, that would dictate the ACC w/ the most all-americans and then people would be upset that this site is bias towards the ACC. As it stands, with the o-line as one unit, this dictates pretty accurately how the season has gone. The Big East and ACC is terrible. The SEC is strong like always, but a little down and the PAC-10 is deeper than expected. I appreciate this site’s opinion and anyone that gets upset over opinion’s of sports needs to sit down and shut up.

  16. Chris October 13, 2010 at 1:39 pm #

    Devin –

    You enjoy this site but people who get upset about sports need to shut up? Clearly you’ve not been reading HP’s long whiny conspiracy theories about media bias. That’s what prompted my first post and I’ll repeat…

    Now we know what HP thinks a world without bias would look like.

  17. Roby October 13, 2010 at 8:15 pm #

    HP,

    I don’t know where you get your stats, but Hankins does NOT lead the league in yards per punt. That would be Florida’s Chas Henry with 18 punts for 897. Including a 75 yarder that was downed at the 2 yard line.

    I’m not going to pretend that I know everything about every punter in America. Nor am I going to pretend like I pay any real mind to any punt that isn’t blocked.

    I’m pretty sure you don’t know anything about Chas Henry, as you don’t watch the SEC like you watch the PAC 10. Just like I do not know anything about Trevor Hankins because I mostly watch SEC/ACC football. Let me enlighten you.

    By watching the Gators, I know that Chas Henry has been fantastic. In all honesty, he has been the Gators’ best and possibly most valuable player (what does that say about an offense?). He helps the defense reverse field position and helps give Florida’s struggling offense a shorter field. Moreover, he rarely gets his punts returned. Last year, I believe there was 1 punt returned for 6 yards. This year, it is more of the same. Take away one 41 yard return by Alabama, and he has given up 4 returns for 24 yards. Brilliant.

    Net punting stats are more important than gross, and Florida ranks second in the nation in that category (ASU 15th).

    http://ncaastatpages.com/specialteams/net_punting

    Usually when a player loads up on gross yardage, it is because he blasts it every time with no regard to touchbacks (ala Ray Guy). Henry only has 2 touchbacks.

    The kicker in this debate (pun intended) is that Florida’s placekicker Caleb Sturgis missed the last two games with a back injury. Having not kicked since high school, Henry came in and made 2/3 FGs and 3/3 XPs.

    Since in all likelihood, you chose your All-American punter by picking the first name on a yards per punt leaderboard, I submit that you revise your pick after looking at an accurate leader board.

    http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/years/2010-punting.html

    • Heismanpundit October 14, 2010 at 1:51 pm #

      Hankins leads the nation in yards per punt. I’m not sure where you get your stats, but here is the CFBStats link here:

      http://www.cfbstats.com/2010/leader/national/player/split01/category06/sort01.html

      Henry does not officially lead because he has not punted enough to qualify for the national rankings.

      Look, it’s just a midseason recognition…nothing to get worked up about.

  18. Roby October 14, 2010 at 1:39 am #

    HP,

    Why are you censoring my posts?

    • Heismanpundit October 14, 2010 at 1:47 pm #

      Wasnt censoring….my blog holds up all comments that have multiple links until I approve them.

  19. Chris October 14, 2010 at 5:11 pm #

    Florida leads the nation in punting and is 2nd in net punting and HP’s argument is that Chas Henry is 3 punts short of the right stuff?

    Let’s face it Roby, Henry’s only problem is that he doesn’t punt in the Pac 10.

    • Heismanpundit October 15, 2010 at 12:21 pm #

      Funny how no other site has Chas Henry as the All-American punter, while several have the ASU guy. Guess they are all Pac-10 homers, too.

  20. Devin October 15, 2010 at 9:36 am #

    Who cares about Punters!?!?!? Go watch soccer.

  21. Chris October 15, 2010 at 2:43 pm #

    HP –

    I’m just pointing out your Pac 10 homerism. Roby’s the guy who was advocating for Chas Henry. But you look like a Pac 10 clown for saying Henry doesn’t count because Florida hasn’t punted enough.

    I see Anthony Santella of Illinois on 3 lists and Kyle Martens of Rice on 2. Since you say several have Hankins #1, how about citing 3? This should be very easy for you if you’re not making it up.

  22. Who October 16, 2010 at 6:28 am #

    You tell us Trevor Hankins is the #1 punter on “several” other mid-season All American teams… if you can’t list three, can you at least list two?